April 13, 2012
Just a bunch of qualities or characteristics I want to embody.
Written on Kairos 104

Just a bunch of qualities or characteristics I want to embody.

Written on Kairos 104

April 13, 2012
"His Death for our Salvation became His Design for our Imitation"

— John Piper in “A grain of wheat dies”

April 13, 2012
"Work Smart, not hard."

— Cheftomm on Youtube, in his video about knife skills!

April 13, 2012

Rainbow Cupcakes!

Not actually a fan of cupcakes, but Anna really wanted to make them so we did. Making a Safeway run with the little sis was quite nice, can’t wait to be a parent omg. Unfortunately the layers wouldn’t stay straight because the cupcake rose so there’s an awkward hill…

Tasted good! Truth: Something about baking/cooking, probably the ‘creation’ aspect, is a lot of fun and good for family bonding.

April 13, 2012
Soup for Lunch was bommmmmb :)
Soup:
Tomato soup from can
Water and Cream
Mushrooms, sausage, onion, red bell pepper, tofu, boiled egg, jalapeno, potatoes.
Cheese
Croutons, egg, cucumber, ect. for garnish

Soup for Lunch was bommmmmb :)

Soup:

  1. Tomato soup from can
  2. Water and Cream
  3. Mushrooms, sausage, onion, red bell pepper, tofu, boiled egg, jalapeno, potatoes.
  4. Cheese
  5. Croutons, egg, cucumber, ect. for garnish

April 12, 2012
Hector the bus driver.
Hector: Mira, el huerto de naranjas.
Yo: Que grande es. Hoy dia muchos trabajos involucran maquinas, pero en los huertos...
Hector: Necesitan personas, no? Nada mejor que los manos.
Yo: Si, un hombre hablo en Bellarmine sobre las condiciones y los peligros del trabajo. Que muchos se mueren en los huertos.
Hector: Si, tambien que usan muchas quimicas en las frutas.
Yo: Este mundo, a veces, no es justo.
April 12, 2012
Camp site in Mexico.
Truths learned:
Manual Labor sucks. So many people in the world do manual labor to support their own livelihood or their family’s, and they need economic justice and social change. 
Education is the key to development. The children in Tijuana don’t go to school unless their families can afford the $80-$100 per year that it costs for materials and transportation. Sadly, not too many can spend that kind of money.
God exponentially multiplies the good of your work. Like in Howie’s story, one week of work translated to a new life for the young boy. Sure, I’ll forget about Raul and his family sometime soon. But the work we did will be used by God to do wonders, and in that faith, I continue to strive to do all I can for others.

Camp site in Mexico.

Truths learned:

  1. Manual Labor sucks. So many people in the world do manual labor to support their own livelihood or their family’s, and they need economic justice and social change. 
  2. Education is the key to development. The children in Tijuana don’t go to school unless their families can afford the $80-$100 per year that it costs for materials and transportation. Sadly, not too many can spend that kind of money.
  3. God exponentially multiplies the good of your work. Like in Howie’s story, one week of work translated to a new life for the young boy. Sure, I’ll forget about Raul and his family sometime soon. But the work we did will be used by God to do wonders, and in that faith, I continue to strive to do all I can for others.

April 12, 2012
Howie’s Story

Just got back from a Tijuana Immersion trip with Bellarmine yesterday, and it was kinda crazy. 4 days of manual labor to get a concrete foundation, 2by4 walls, roof, and stucco all done was no easy task. On top of that, we had to live in tents and take cold bucket showers.

Honestly, I didn’t enjoy it while I was there, and I had a lot of complaints. Like how the trip to Mexico involved very minimal spanish speaking! I felt under the weather for the majority of the trip, so I worked, ate, then slept. Last, a lot of the guys were so immature and insensitive to other people. I understand they’re teenage boys, but the way they talked about girls made me really indignant. And racism on a cultural immersion trip is just unacceptable.

But as I look back on it now, it was a great trip and I’d be willing to go again. My body is already recovering and I feel clean. I actually did get to use lots of spanish with Hector, our bus driver who drove us and also worked at a site. The house we got done was so nice, and the family with two kids was so grateful. Some of the discussions I had on the bus were really meaningful and enjoyable (e.g. having a Vietnamese Jesuit Priest who we called ‘The General’ tell us about the movie Bruno).

Anyways, getting to the post title, here’s Howie’s story:

[Howie was our construction supervisor who’s worked with Amor Ministries for 20+ years]

I was with a group of highschoolers coming back from the worksite when they told me that they were hungry. So we stopped at a McDonald’s and I let them get some food, if you can call it that. As we got off the van, I noticed that a security guard had taken notice of me and the group. He sorta followed us to McDonald’s and stood outside looking in. I thought he was just suspicious of us or sensing the trouble a group of teenage americans could cause. But then, after a while, he came up to me and told me, “Twenty years ago, you built my house. It let me get an education and now a secure job to support my family. You could say that you, in one week, made me a man for a lifetime.” 

April 12, 2012
"You’ve Come.
You’ve Built.
You’ve Brought Hope.
Thank you"

— Amor ministries handed us shirts to thank us for our participation, and the shirts’ tags had this on them. 

April 12, 2012

National sibling day (or whatever it’s called) was yesterday!

If I should be thankful about one thing, it’s my siblings. Not too many people in this world are lucky enough to be the oldest of five, especially not in the Korean community. But my parents braved the storm, made crippling sacrifices, and worked hard so that all five of us would grow up properly and support one another. Can’t believe that I changed my first diaper at age 5, and it’s funny that I felt my siblings were such a burden for so long. Now, I know I wouldn’t be half the person I am now without them.

Matt, Tim, Shong, and Anna (unpictured): you are sorta like my children, and I would give up all I had to make your lives better. Keep smiling and working hard whatever you do. So excited for our massive family reunions in the futuuure!

April 5, 2012
Strawberries with chocolate whipped cream 
Nothing better than simple fruit with a touch of sugary chocolately cream.
Chocolate Whipped Cream:
1 cup heavy whipping cream (COLD)
1 tablespoon powdered sugar (to taste)
couple drops vanilla extract
1 tablespoons cocoa powder. (add more to taste)
In COLD mixing bowl, pour cream and whip until about 3/4 to whippedcream texture (about 4 min by hand). Add sugar, vanilla, cocoa powder. Whip the last fourth, until it sits in whisk. Serve! 

Strawberries with chocolate whipped cream 

Nothing better than simple fruit with a touch of sugary chocolately cream.

Chocolate Whipped Cream:

1 cup heavy whipping cream (COLD)

1 tablespoon powdered sugar (to taste)

couple drops vanilla extract

1 tablespoons cocoa powder. (add more to taste)

In COLD mixing bowl, pour cream and whip until about 3/4 to whippedcream texture (about 4 min by hand). Add sugar, vanilla, cocoa powder. Whip the last fourth, until it sits in whisk. Serve! 

April 5, 2012

Fr. Greg Boyle is a man for others and one of my role models. Whether it’s reading his book, meeting him at Homeboy Industries in LA, listening to his speech, or getting a book signed, whatever I learn concerning him and his work is valuable.

While visiting Homeboys, our Bellarmine group was disappointed that Father G (as they all called him) wasn’t in his office to greet us. Before we set out to leave, we took some time to peruse the souvenir store, and while we were there Fr. G came! I was too busy looking at the sweaters to see that most of our group had gone into to lobby to meet and greet him. By the time I got to the group, he was already in the middle of saying something to our teacher, and I had to join at the back of the group. With four to five people in front of me, I wasn’t even sure he’d seen me. He paused as he was speaking to Hache, looked right at me, stuck out his arm, and introduced himself to me. My God, I had never felt so dignified or thankful, for some strange reason this handshake meant more than just a friendly greeting.

Truth: Nothing, NOTHING is more important in the struggle for social change to accommodate justice than recognizing the humanity in every single person. Without discrimination, honoring the presence of God in each human being. 

April 5, 2012
Homelessness. In the Bay Area.

There’s a statistic that’s been stuck in my head for a while, and it bugs me more the more I think about it:

It costs the government (and in turn the taxpayer) three times more to leave someone on the streets than to house them WITH services. 

It makes fiscal sense to pursue justice, and we still won’t! When will we open our eyes and see?

Truth: I will not live in ignorance, because Justice is more important than my every personal whim, desire, and dream.

April 5, 2012

There’s nothing like grace- getting love that you don’t deserve. Not sure why, but Kim gave me something I’ve always wanted and never really had: A job! Well, more like a paid internship, but still- a way to earn money, learn some office skills, and get experience. Thank you for our little jokes, for your many encouragements, and for being my boss! Best of luck in Texas!

April 4, 2012

Ironically, I found this on the “Complaints about Facebook Page” On FACEBOOK! 


It’s so crazy how much I Hate and Love Facebook. Truth: I have to spend less time on Facebook…

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